Multi-level Prevention System

Multi-Level Prevention System

Multi-level prevention system includes three levels of intensity or prevention. The primary prevention level includes high quality core instruction. The secondary level includes evidence-based intervention(s) of moderate intensity. The tertiary prevention level includes individualized intervention(s) of increased intensity for students who show minimal response to secondary prevention.

At all levels, attention should be on fidelity of implementation, with consideration for cultural and linguistic responsiveness and recognition of student strengths.

The primary level may be known as Tier I, the secondary level  as Tier II, and the tertiary level as Tier III or intensive intervention. 

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Center Resources

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In this webinar Dr. Tessie Rose Bailey provides an overview of the essential components of RTI including screening, progress monitoring, a school-wide, multi-level prevention system, and data-based decision making.

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After scores on the 2014 New York State English language arts assessment at P.S. 52 Sheepshead Bay School in Brooklyn were unsatisfactory, first-year principal Rafael Alvarez searched for a way to improve academic outcomes for his students, who come from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds and about a quarter of whom are English language learners.

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In this webinar, Dr. Katie Klingler Tackett provides an overview of Schoolwide Multi-Level Prevention Systems also commonly know as a Multi-Tiered System of Support. She discusses key features of each level or tier within the system including the primary level (Tier I), secondary level (Tier II), and tertiary level (Tier III).  

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In this presentation, Drs. Dia Jackson and Jennifer Pierce focused on two key lessons learned about RTI implementation based on findings from a recent study conducted by Balu, Zu, Doolittle, Schiller, Jenkins, & Gersten (2015) and work with states and districts. The session shows how seemingly small decisions related to fidelity of implementation can have a powerful impact on student outcomes and provides recommendations for how to implement RTI to achieve improved student learning outcomes. 

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Response to Intervention (RTI) and Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) are frameworks for integrating instruction, evidence-based interventions, and assessments to meet the academic and behavior needs of all students. The essential components of MTSS are as follows: screening, progress monitoring, a multilevel prevention system, and data-based decision making (National Center on Response to Intervention, 2010).

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This guide explains how leaders can use a research-based framework for response to intervention (RTI) to improve learning for all students. The majority of states have some form of RTI initiative in place already. This guide can help states leverage existing initiatives to support the statewide school improvement efforts spelled out in their ESEA flexibility plans.

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Ongoing sustained professional development that allows educators to continuously examine, reflect upon, and improve instructional practice, data-based decision making, and delivery of interventions is essential for implementing a multi-tiered system of support (MTSS). Where do we find resources to provide this professional development?

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As response to intervention (RTI) grows into its adolescence, questions about efficacy and challenges with implementation have emerged. In this webinar, panelists Lynn Fuchs, Doug Fuchs, Allison Gandhi, and Rebecca Zumeta Edmonds address findings from the recent Institute of Education Sciences evaluation of RTI, as well as lessons learned from state and local evaluations of implementation. They also discuss how use of increasingly available high-quality resources, combined with intensive, comprehensive implementation provide reasons for optimism that RTI can indeed progress from a tumultuous adolescence to successful adulthood. 

Non-Center Resources

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This Practice Guide, released by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) in April 2009, aims to help educators develop and implement Response to Intervention (RTI) to assist students struggling in math. The focus is building an instructional program in order to improve outcomes for students who have difficulty with math. The guide presents recommendations about screening, instruction, and progress monitoring and indicates the quality of the research base that supports them. It includes common questions and potential concerns that might arise with each recommendation and suggestions to help alleviate those concerns. Technical details about the studies that were used to generate the recommendations are also presented.

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This Practice Guide, released by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) in February 2009, aims to help educators develop and implement Response to Intervention to assist students struggling with reading. The focus is building an instructional program in order to improve outcomes for students who have difficulty with reading as well as set in place a screening process for all students. The guide presents recommendations and indicates the quality of the research base that supports them. It includes common questions and potential concerns that might arise with each recommendation and suggestions to help alleviate those concerns. Technical details about the studies that were used to generate the recommendations are also presented.

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This Practice Guide, released by Institute of Education Sciences (IES) in September 2008, aims to help educators develop and implement prevention and intervention strategies that promote positive student behavior. The guide presents recommendations and indicates the quality of the research base that supports them. It includes common questions and potential concerns that might arise with each recommendation and suggestions to help alleviate those concerns. Technical details about the studies that were used to generate the recommendations are also presented.

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This 2007 brief is a meta-analysis of thirty-one studies on interventions targeting adolescents struggling with reading. Specifically, it looks at (1) effective interventions for struggling adolescent readers, (2) what the specific impact of reading interventions are on reading comprehension, and (3) what specific impact reading interventions have for students with learning disabilities. The analysis further categories study findings depending on the type of reading intervention, the grade grouping (middle school vs. high school), and who implemented the intervention (research vs. teacher). The brief was written by a collaboration of authors for the Center on Instruction.

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This brief developed by the Center on Great Teachers & Leaders outlines a framework for coherence that supports states in connecting college and career readiness standards, multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS), and educator effectiveness by capitalizing on their shared goal: improving instructional quality to enhance educational outcomes for students. The brief asks readers to examine the shared goals, context, and identify instructional connections across initiatives that support better learning outcomes for all students.

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The CEEDAR Center has designed a Course Enhancement Module (CEM) on Classroom and Behavior Management which is designed to support participants in gaining an understanding of assessment tools and intervention practices that can be integrated within a comprehensive, evidence-based behavioral intervention program. The multi-part module covers universal, supplemental, and intensive supports including supports for students with intensive behavioral needs.

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Despite inclusion within federal and state policies and the wide implementation of tiered frameworks in both academics and behavior, confusion with terminology, how to understand the continuum of services and level of evidence across the framework, and how to serve culturally and linguistically diverse populations continue to exist and challenge implementation success. Panelists review current research and provide relevant examples from the field to assist practitioners in tackling these topics. 

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How do you know if an intervention, program, or practice is likely to be effective with a particular subgroup of students? What resources are there to help school, district, and State leaders identify and select evidence-based practices (EBPs)?  EBPs play an increasingly prominent role in Federal education policy. In both State Systemic Improvement Plans (SSIPs) and provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), States are being asked to implement practices and programs that have evidence of effectiveness. This online module is intended to help teachers and leaders at the school, district, and State level identify and select interventions, practices, and programs that have evidence of effectiveness. 

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Promises to Keep, developed through a partnership with Council for Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the CEEDAR Center, outlines some key policy actions state education agencies can take to ensure that teacher and leader preparation prepares teachers to work with ALL learners, particularly those who have the greatest learning and behavioral needs.

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This collection of sample lesson's and activities are intended to assist special education teachers, interventionists, and others working with students with intensive mathematics needs. The materials include considerations for instruction, sample activities, and companion materials necessary to complete the activities. The mathematics materials are aligned with college- and career-ready standards and cover a range of skill areas. The materials are not intended to be used as an intervention, but can provide support for developing and customizing lessons to meet student needs. 

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Response to intervention (RTI) is a multi-level prevention system to maximize student achievement and reduce behavioral problems. With RTI, schools use data to identify students at risk of poor learning outcomes, monitor student progress, provide and adjust evidence-based interventions when needed, and identify students with learning disabilities or other disabilities. In this video, Dia Jackson describes the importance of implementing RTI with fidelity and how she provides RTI coaching and professional development to schools so that they see gains in student achievement.